Roasted Brussels Sprouts with Pine Nuts and Parmesan

I took this recipe straight from Bay Area Bites as it incorporates many things I love: Brussels sprouts, cheese, and food you can eat with your hands!  Brussels sprouts are flavorful, mini cabbages that roast up into crispy on the outside, tender on the inside, orbs of pallet pleasing nutrition.  This recipe calls for cooking and serving the sprouts on skewers, making them perfect party food, or maybe a fun way to get your kids (roommates, spouse) interested in eating green veggies.  If you don’t have skewers, don’t fret, you can simply skip that step.  If you are avoiding as much sugar as possible use Apple Cider Vinegar in place of the balsamic.

Photo from Bay Area Bites: Sprouts on a stick!

Ingredients:

  • 1 pound of Brussels sprouts
  • 1/8 cup pine nuts, finely diced
  • Balsamic vinegar or Apple Cider Vinegar or Fire Cider
  • Olive oil
  • Parmesan cheese

Procedure:

Trim and peel away the outer leaves of each Brussels sprout and then half them.

Slide the Brussels sprout halves onto the skewers, about six to eight halves per skewer.

Line a baking dish with parchment paper and places the skewers halved-side up.

Drizzle olive oil and balsamic vinegar over each skewer, trying to “fill up” the Brussels sprouts.

Brussels sprouts on a stick ready to bake, photo from Bay Area Bites

Bake the skewers at 400 degrees for about 30 minutes until they are cooked and crispy.

Plate the skewers on a serving tray and cover them with shaved Parmesan and the pine nuts.

Original post can be found HERE!

Turnip Chips

Turnip chips!

Turnips are a grounding winter root vegetable and  provide an excellent source of vitamin C, fiber, folic acid and copper.  They also offer a very good source of thiamine, potassium, niacin, and magnesium.  In addition, they are a good source of vitamin B6 and E, folic acid, and riboflavin.  One cup of turnip root has 9 grams of carbohydrates, 7.5 of which are fiber.  You can easily make mashed turnip the same way you make mashed potatoes just don’t expect them to be quite as creamy.  Turnips also make a great addition to mashed potatoes, especially if you have picky eaters at your house!

The following recipes is for baked turnip chips, the dark parts are crunchy, the light parts slightly chewy.  It’s easy to make a big batch and equally as easy to eat them all, lightly salted.  You could also deep fry these but baking seemed easier to me….

Ingredients:

A bunch of roasting turnips (purple-top, golden, white, etc.)

Vegetable oil for roasting/frying

salt

Procedure:

Preheat oven to 375. Slice the turnips very thinly, if you have a mandoline in your kitchen, this is the perfect time to use it!  Or, the slicing attachment to your Cuisinart type machine will work as well, that’s what I used.

Turnip slices

Pour a good amount of oil into a shallow baking dish (or baking sheet with sides) large enough for the turnips to coat the bottom in one layer. If you have more turnips than room, you can use multiple dishes and/or make the chips in batches. Toss turnips in oil to coat, sprinkle with salt, and toss again. Roast in oven until crispy, about 10-15 minutes. You may want/need to turn the turnips once or twice so they’ll cook evenly.

Here’s where I got the original recipe.

Afternoon Crack: Nori Never Tasted So Good

Crispy, crunchy nori snack!

I think I’m addicted! Crunchy and salty, this toasted seaweed snack rules.  My love of this recipe may have something to do with my thyroid.  Seaweed has a lot of iodine in it and iodine supports normal thyroid function.   When I am under stress or feeling a little out of balance sometimes I crave nori or kelp, I know the craving is my thyroid asking for some support.  I used to have Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis but that got annoying so I gave it up.  Who wants to take Synthroid everyday anyway?  Why not make something delicious instead, I’ll have my medicine and eat it too!  I found this on The Kitchn and the link that follows is for their recipe, which I tried and then modified, of course.

Not just for sushi, you can eat it as is, crumble over salads or use as a wrap!

Ingredients for Wasabi Toasted Nori:

3 Tablespoons water and 1 Tablespoon sesame oil (or olive oil)
2 Tablespoons powdered horseradish wasabi
5 sheets nori
salt

This recipe is easily doubled, if you decide you really like it!

You should be able to pick up some Nori and wasabi powder the next time you find yourself in that aisle of the grocery store where they keep all of the interesting ingredients.

The international aisle, white people welcome....

Heat oven to 250°F.  Or, if for some reason you oven is not functioning you can use your toaster oven.  This snack is dorm room friendly!

Combine 2 tablespoons water and 1 tablespoon wasabi in a small bowl and whisk with a fork until the wasabi is dissolved. The wasabi tends to settle to the bottom, so you may need to re-whisk between batches.

Combine the sesame oil, 1 tablespoon wasabi and 1 tablespoon water in another bowl.  It will be like a thick paste.

The bowl on the left has wasabi and water, the bowl on the right has wasabi, sesame oil and water.

Take one sheet of nori and fold it in half. Unfold it and lightly paint half the sheet with the wasabi water using a pastry brush. Sprinkle the inside with salt and press it closed. Lightly brush the top with the wasabi sesame oil and water mixture.

Using a pair of kitchen scissors, cut the nori into 5 or 6 strips and transfer them to a baking sheet.

Using kitchen scissors to cut strips of wasabi basted nori.

Repeat this process with each sheet of nori until you have filled the baking sheet. Strips can be close to each other, but should be in a single layer without touching.

Nori, ready to get baked!

Bake for 10-13 minutes, until darkened, dry to the touch, and brittle. Transfer the nori crisps to a cooling rack to finish crisping. Repeat with any remaining sheets of nori.

If you do happen to have any leftovers, I didn’t, store them in an airtight container. They will stale a bit with time, but should still stay crispy for a few days.